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ECEN 4610 Projects
Fall 2005

Team BioSec

Team members:
  • Mat Merkow
  • Tung Nguyen
  • Dipesh Shakya

Project Description:

Our project is primarily a security device that allows a client to be authenticated remotely (approx. 20-30 yards away) and given access to a facility, entry to a building, control of lights or other devices, etc. Secondly it is a Biometric information transmitter that could be used to transmit patents bio-signs to a nursing station, a doctor's PDA or other electronic device.

We will create two devices: the primary device that is responsible for authentication and communication and the secondary device that controls the light, garage door, etc., and receives data collected by the primary device.

  1. Fingerprint authentication using FPGA in primary device.
  2. Communication with secondary device using radio signal/Bluetooth/Wi-Fi
    • Activates light, door, etc.
    • Send data (Pulse, oxygen level, blood pressure, etc)
  3. Verify that user of authenticator is living using a pulse oximeter to measure oxygen levels in blood and pulse rate.
  4. Secondary device is able to cut and supply power to device being controlled.
  5. Secondary device send basic signal to controlled device.
  6. Create a user interface for operating the primary device.
    • Add/Remove fingerprint
    • List of devices functionalities
    • Add/Remove controlled devices
  7. Create interfaces for other devices, garage door, elevator, computer access, etc.
  8. Connect other data gathering devices to primary device so that one can monitor environment remotely (for example, a hospital patient).

Feasibility: due to the high complexity of the project as well as the limitation of members in the group, we think the primary device can be completed with a LCD user interface. For the secondary device, if we don't have enough time, activates light module will be chosen for the purpose of the course.

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (1.4 MB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (777 kB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Team Carpal Tunnel

Team members:
  • Nael Cassier
  • Henock Negassa
  • Anthony Sawyer
  • Mason Stone

Project Description:

To design and build a small box that integrates a digital signal processor to add audio effects to a guitar input or other analog source. When the user uses a guitar input, he/she can use buttons and LCD to select various guitar effects, which will then be applied to the (digitally converted) audio signal and passed out through the analog output. As with most guitar effects pedals, this unit will use a 9VDC source, available through either a battery or a 9V DC adapter.

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (1.4 MB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (1.3 MB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Team CPNE

Team members:
  • Crossen Davis
  • Peter Ramer
  • Nancy Robinson
  • Eric Rodriguez

Project Description:

We have a goal of building a car which will have the capability of being controlled wirelessly. This car will have a number of sensors on it that will send back data. Possible sensors may be: temperature, sound, light, video, GPS, ect... This data will be sent back to the source wirelessly via either RF, 8011B, or serial cable. The car could be controlled by a website upon further analysis. The data can also be stored in on on board flash card. As we move along in our project, we are leaving ourselves open to any other anmenities that we might be able to add on.

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (221 kB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (695 kB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Team Doki Doki

Team members:
  • Matt Freeman
  • James Kirby
  • Juan Rivera

Project Description:

Our group, Team Doki Doki, proposes to design a paintball gun auto-tracking/sensing system. It will feature a stripped-down paintball gun that is controlled via two stepper motors. One stepper motor rotates the gun left/right (most likely on a Lazy Susan) and a second stepper motor controls the up/down movement of the barrel. A linear actuator will be used to physically pull the gun's trigger. The stepper motors and actuator will be connected to the GPIO of a Xilinx Spartan 3 board. The board's FPGA will run a state machine with two main modes of operation: manual and automatic. When in manual mode, the left/right, up/down, and firing performance of the gun will be adjusted via an NES videogame controller connected to the serial port of the Spartan 3. This mode will be implemented first, as it will be the more straightforward of the two. The NES controller will also be used to switch the state machine between auto/manual modes. When switched into automatic control, the gun will either scan for or track a certain type of target. This target may be a certain color, if we end up implementing video capture and analysis into the board, or it may be using IR, which would require the target to be wearing an IR sensor. Perhaps there is even another method? Currently, we are not sure what will be most feasible while still yielding some practical application.

This auto-tracking gun could have two potentially marketable uses. First, it could be used rather directly as a "sentry gun" in paintball arenas. It would scan for human players, potentially only those from a certain team, and create an additional hazard they must avoid. This would create another interesting aspect to the popular game of paintball. Second, it could be used as a home security device. The gun could placed in front of a door or window and automatically perform non-lethal attacks to scare away intruders while the homeowner sleeps or is out. Such an implementation could be especially useful for those with hearing and/or vision problems, as they may have trouble detecting the intruder on their own. Note that both of these uses would be more practical if the auto-sensing/tracking mode of the gun were based on thermal detection, although this form of targeting is not fiscally reasonable for our prototype.

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (1.6 MB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (5.3 MB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Team MADD

Team members:
  • Daniel Brink
  • Michael Davies
  • Dan Hoang
  • Andrew Mountain

Project Description:

At the request of Colorado Space Grant, we are building a system that will act as the Power Distribution Control Unit for the Colorado Space Grant Consortium's satellite Citizen Explorer. The functionality of the PDCU has to meet specific given criteria, including:

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (1.4 MB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (919 kB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Team Puerile

Team members:
  • Kevin Chang
  • Andrew Jenkins
  • Julie Lam
  • Jason Smith

Project Description:

The project will be a soda jerk. This will perform the functions of serving sodas and other assorted beverages to people.

Use Cases:

Interface:

Functions: ( In order of importance)

Physical appearance:

Performance Limitations:

Feasibility:

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (318 kB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (790 kB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Team PYXIS

Team members:
  • April Lewis
  • Aaron Martin
  • Steven Sherk

Project Description:

The objective is to build a general purpose microprocessor using the XCV300 FPGA board and Verilog. The 16 bit RISC will be created using MIPS design as a foundation. The processor will use state machine principles: fetch, decode, execute, read, and write to execute the instruction and data code. The processor will contain the following major components: controller, memory, instruction register, data registers, and an ALU. User interfaces will consist of Monitor/LCD and Keypad/keyboard.

We will create our own reduced instruction set and develop an assembler to convert the assembly code to machine language. The assembler will be written in C and executed on a PC. EPROM or EEPROM, and SRAM will be used to store the code necessary to test the microprocessor.

Test code could include a word game like scrabble, an output to a piece of hardware like a speaker or motor, or code that tests the performance of the processor design. For demonstration, a monitor could be used to display graphics that we design in our own assembly language or higher level mystery language.

Some possible design features include the following:

Preliminary Design Review presentation:  (184 kB PowerPoint)

Critical Design Review presentation:  (868 kB PowerPoint)

Expo Photos


Additional Fall 2005 Capstone Photos