ECEN 2250

Introduction to Circuits and Electronics

Spring 2015

M W F 9:00-9:50 AM:      ECCR 155

Page last updated 26 January 2015

Latest Announcements

15 January 2015: The room used for the grader's office hours has changed; see below. The times have been adjusted slightly as well.

Instructor: Prof. Edward F. Kuester

Office Phone

Email

Office

Office Hours

(303) 492-5173

kuester@schof.colorado.edu

ECOT 248

M 3:30-5:00, Tu 12:00-1:00, W 4:00-5:00, Th 10:00-11:00 and 4:00-5:00, or by appointment

Grader: Becky Torrey

Email

Room

Office Hours

Rebecca.Torrey@Colorado.EDU

ECEE 285

M W 5:00 to 6:00 PM

Main Headings on this Page

Course Information     Course Calendar    Lecture and Reading Schedule  Supplemental (EK) homework problems   Corrections to the text   Exam Dates   Old Announcements   Free Technical Software

Course Information

General

In this course, you will be introduced to the behavior of linear electric circuits, and will see some of the ways in which they are used in electrical engineering. The text is The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits (7th edition), by R. E. Thomas, A. J. Rosa and G. J. Toussaint. This is also the text currently used for ECEN 2260. A copy has been placed on reserve in the Engineering Library. If you are curious to learn more about circuits, or to see the material from different viewpoints, I have also put the following books on reserve at the Engineering Library:

Additionally, the following Internet resource may be of interest:

CU Engineering Fellows (fellows.colorado.edu) may offer review and study sessions for this course if interest is expressed.

Grades

Your grade for the course will be determined as follows (the value of your weakest monthly or final exam will be reduced by 5%):

Homework

20%

3 Monthly Exams

20% each

Final Exam

25%

Each component of your grade will be assigned a grade (A, A-, B+, B, B-, etc.) based on a curve for that particular component. Different components (e. g., Homework and Monthly Exam #1) will generally be curved differently. The grade is converted to a grade point between 0 and 4 (A = 4.0, B = 3.0, etc.), and it is these grade point values which are weighted according to the table above.

As an example, suppose you got a B (3.0) on the homework, a D (1.0) on the first monthly exam, a C (2.0) on the second monthly exam, an A- (3.7) on the third monthly exam and a B+ (3.3) on the final exam. Your course grade would then be:

(3.0)×0.2 + (1.0)×[0.2 - 0.05] + (2.0)×0.2 + (3.7)×0.2 + (3.3)×0.25 = 2.715

which is a B-.

I expect that you will abide by all University expectations of academic integrity. Please read the information on this, as well as on disabilities, religious observances and standards of behavior.

Class preparation

You should read the assigned sections of the book prior to each lecture. I will always be glad to help you with any questions you may have during my office hours since there will not always be time for long answers during the lectures. Please feel free to come in for help. I hope the office hours will be such that everyone in the course can make use of at least some of them. In any case, you can also make an appointment to see me at other times. If you don't understand something, I'll never know until you ask or until you fail an exam. Why not ask?

Homework

Homework assignments are posted a week ahead of time and due every Friday in the lecture period unless indicated to the contrary on the calendar below. They will be graded and returned to you the following week. Please put your student number next to your name on your homework and exams (anything you turn in to be graded). It helps me resolve ambiguities when there is difficulty reading your handwriting. Late homework is not accepted. You can turn homework in early by putting it in my mailbox in the ECEE office (make sure to put them in the slot below my name). When submitting a solution to a homework (or exam) problem, be sure to follow these requirements:

  1. Explain in your own words what you are being asked to do.
  2. State the method you will be using to find the solution.
  3. Carry out the solution, indicating each step as you go.
  4. Write legibly and in a logical order (no "flow charts").
A solution that contains nothing but equations is not sufficient, and points will be taken off if these requirements are not fulfilled. All questions regarding grading of the homework should be directed to the grader (see her contact information above).

Problems from the text vs. "EK" problems

Problems from the text will be worth a maximum of 4 points each. Problems marked "EK" in the homework assignments come from a collection of my own problems, which may be downloaded in PDF format. All "EK" problems will be kept in one file, which will be updated when necessary as the semester progresses. The date of the last update will be placed at the beginning of the file for reference.All "EK" problems will be worth 10 points each.

Software

Little use of software is made in this class. Very occasionally you may need to compute or plot something that is a little more complex than a handheld calculator is convenient for. In such a case, you may use any appropriate software, so long as your results are clear. Matlab, Mathematica and MathCad are all fine for this purpose; even Excel works well. Several freeware programs are listed below and can be used if you don't want to pay for software specifically for this course.

Exams

There will be three in-class (50 minute) monthly exams. The exams are closed-book and closed-notes, but you may bring one (for the monthly exams) or two (for the final exam) 8-½" by 11" sheet(s) of notes and a calculator. The schedule of exams is listed in the calendar. Currently planned dates for the monthly exams are February 13, March 16 and April 17, 2015, but these are subject to minor changes if circumstances warrant. The final exam (2-½ hours long) will be held on Thursday, May 7, 2015 from 4:30 to 7:00 PM in ECCR 155. The final exam will be cumulative, but with emphasis on the final third of the course. Thus, about two-thirds of the questions on the final exam will be on chapters 1-6 and 8, and the other third will be on the material from chapter 7.

If you have 3 or 4 final exams on Thursday, May 7, you need to see the instructor(s) of the course(s) which have their final exams in the third (and possibly fourth) time slots of that day in a timely manner, to make arrangements to take those exams on a different day in accordance with University rules. The official deadline for doing so is the end of the tenth week of the semester: Friday, March 20, 2015.

Syllabus and Schedules

The calendar below gives a day by day list of lecture topics, reading and homework assignments and exams. I will not announce these separately in class; it is your responsibility to check this page for all assignments, and be prepared appropriately for each.

Calendar

Refer to lecture and reading assignment schedule for lecture topics and reading assignments. HW = Homework due that day.
Problems numbered simply x-xx are taken from the text and will be worth 4 points each.
Problems numbered EKx-xx are from the
supplemental homework problems provided in PDF format and will be worth 10 points each. You may need to refresh your browser to see new problems that are added.
Homework and reading assignments are subject to change as needed as the semester progresses. They will not be changed when there is less than one week until they are due.
If you like to do homework well ahead of time, be warned of this and check before turning in your assignment that you have done the correct problems.

January

12
Lecture 1



14
Lecture 2



16
Lecture 3

HW: 1-20, 2-2, 2-10, 2-24, EK1-1, EK1-2, EK1-3, EK2-1
EK solutions

19

NO CLASS

(MLK Holiday)


21
Lecture 4


23
Lecture 5

HW: 2-26, 2-38, EK2-2, EK2-3, EK2-4
EK solutions
26
Lecture 6


28
Lecture 7


30
Lecture 8

HW: 2-48, 2-60, 2-64, 2-70, EK2-5, EK2-6, EK2-7, EK2-8

February

2
Lecture 9


4
Lecture 10



6
Lecture 11


9
Lecture 12


11
Lecture 13


13
Monthly Exam #1
(on chapters 1-3)

16
Lecture 14


18
Lecture 15

20
Lecture 16


23
Lecture 17



25
Lecture 18



27
Lecture 19

March

2
Lecture 20



4
Lecture 21



6
Lecture 22


9
Lecture 23



11
Lecture 24



13
Lecture 25


16

Monthly Exam #2
(on chapters 5, 6, 8)


18
Lecture 26



20
Lecture 27


23

NO CLASSES


(SPRING BREAK)
24

NO CLASSES


(SPRING BREAK)
25

NO CLASSES


(SPRING BREAK)
26

NO CLASSES


(SPRING BREAK)
27

NO CLASSES


(SPRING BREAK)
30
Lecture 28





April





1
Lecture 29



3
Lecture 30

6
Lecture 31



8
Lecture 32


10
Lecture 33


13
Lecture 34



15
Lecture 35



17

Monthly Exam #3
(on chapter 4)

20
Lecture 36


22
Lecture 37

24
Lecture 38


27
Lecture 39


29
Lecture 40


May












1
Lecture 41

LAST DAY OF CLASSES



7

Final Exam               4:30 - 7:00 PM           Room: ECCR 155



Lecture and Reading Schedule

Lecture No.

Topic

New Reading Assignment Before Class (from Textbook)

1

Introduction; The Basics (charge, voltage, current)

NONE

2

Element Laws and Connection (Kirchhoff's) Laws

Chapter 1 and sections 2.1-2.2

3

Combined Use of the Circuit Laws

Section 2.3

4

More Basic Circuit Analysis

NONE

5

Equivalent Circuits

Section 2.4

6

Voltage and Current Division; Thévenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits

Sections 2.5 and 3.4

7

Reduction of (Simplifying) Circuits

Section 2.6

8

More Examples of Analyzing Simple Circuits

NONE

9

Systematic Circuit Analysis: The Node-Voltage Method

Section 3.1

10

More Nodal Analysis

NONE

11

Sinusoidal (AC) Waveforms; Capacitors and Inductors

Sections 5.4 and 6.1-6.2

12

Complex Numbers; Phasors

Appendix A and Sections 8.1-8.2

13

More Phasors

NONE

14

And Still More Phasors: Impedance

NONE

15

Basic Phasor Analysis of Circuits

Section 8.3

16

More Phasor Analysis of Circuits

NONE

17

Translating DC Concepts to Phasor Ones

Section 8.4

18

Phasor Analysis of More Complicated Circuits

Section 8.5

19

More Phasors (Coming Out of Your Ears)

NONE

20

Power and Energy in AC Circuits
Section 8.6

21

More on Power
NONE

22


Sections 4.1-4.2

23


NONE

24


NONE

25


Sections 4.3-4.4

26


Section 4.5

27


NONE

28


Section 6.3

29


NONE
30

NONE

31


NONE

32


NONE

33


Sections 7.1-7.2

34


NONE

35


NONE

36


Section 7.3-7.4

37


Section 7.5

38


Section 7.6
39

NONE

40


NONE

41


NONE

42

NONE


Some Free Programs of Interest

XL-Plot

Windows Freeware. From the website: "Create your graphs for scientific publication with XL-Plot. It reads ascii files and it outputs a vector drawing. XL-Plot is for Windows 2000 and later. The primary purpose of XL-Plot is to create a figure for scientific publication rapidly. It contains a few basic statistical functions, such as Students t-test and linear correlation of two sets of data (two columns in a spreadsheet). XL-Plot has a number of built-in functions that can be fitted to the data in columns on a spreadsheet or to a curve in a graph. The user can easily add fitting functions of his own design.Additional options are Fourier Transformation, (de-)convolution and Matrix inversion." It is a modest piece of software that does a surprising number of tasks well.

Gnuplot

A portable command-line driven interactive data and function plotting utility for UNIX, IBM OS/2, MS Windows, DOS, Macintosh, VMS, Atari (!) and many other platforms. The software is copyrighted but freely distributed (i. e., you don't have to pay for it). It was originally intended as to allow scientists and students to visualize mathematical functions and data. It does this job pretty well, but has grown to support many non-interactive uses, including web scripting and integration as a plotting engine for third-party applications like Octave. Gnuplot supports many types of plots in either 2D and 3D. It can draw using lines, points, boxes, contours, vector fields, surfaces, and various associated text. It also supports various specialized plot types. Gnuplot supports many different types of output: interactive screen terminals (with mouse and hotkey functionality), direct output to pen plotters or modern printers (including postscript and many color devices), and output to many types of file (eps, fig, jpeg, LaTeX, metafont, pbm, pdf, png, postscript, svg, ...).

LTSpice IV

Free Windows high performance Spice III simulator, schematic capture and waveform viewer. Primarily intended for applications using the company's switching regulators, it is a very good general-purpose SPICE program.

Qucs

Quite Universal Circuit Simulator; an open source circuit simulator with graphical user interface (GUI). The software aims to support all kinds of circuit simulation types, e.g. DC, AC, S-parameter, Harmonic Balance analysis, noise analysis, etc. It is available natively for GNU/Linux, but is also ported to many other platforms: MacOS, Windows, Solaris, NetBSD, FreeBSD, etc. Long-term ambitions are grand, but even now it has quite respectable capabilities. Documentation is not quite as complete as could be desired at this stage, however.

Old Announcements

14 January 2015: The figure in Problem EK1-3 did not reproduce properly as originally posted. Please look at the updated PDF file of EK homework problems (refresh your browser if necessary).

15 January 2015: There is a misprint in problem 2-24 of the text; the problem cannot be solved as stated. The equation for Node B should read: -i2 -i3 +i5 = 0.