ECEN 3400

Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

Fall 2015: 3:00-3:50 M W F, Fleming 157

Fall 2015

Page last updated 28 August 2015

Latest Announcements

17 August 2015: Welcome to ECEN 3400. This website will contain all the information you need for the course. Check often for updates.
Assignments and other dated items on this page are generally correct for about one week from today. Items more than one week in the future and undated material are subject to change without notice. Any deviations from this policy will be listed as announcements to the left or below. Please check this page regularly for updates.

Instructor: Prof. Edward F. Kuester

Office Phone

Email

Office

Office Hours

(303) 492-5173

kuester@schof.colorado.edu

ECOT 248

Tu F 9:00-10:00, W 4:00-5:00, Th 3:30-4:30, or by appointment

Main Headings on this Page

Course Information     Course Calendar    Lecture and Reading Schedule    Exam Dates   Old Announcements

Supplementary Textbook (Popović, and B. Popović)
Introductory Electromagnetics: Practice, Problems and Labs 
(Rev. 04-12-2012)
Additional (EK) Homework Problems
(Rev. 08-28-2015)

Notes on Computer-Aided Tomography (CAT)     Sample Exams     Free Technical Software

Course Information

General

In this course, you will be introduced to the behavior of electromagnetic fields, and will see some of the ways in which they are used in electrical engineering. The text is Electromagnetics, by B. Notaroš. A scanned copy of the supplementary text, Introductory Electromagnetics, by Z. Popović, and B. Popović is freely available in PDF format for download (be sure to check the errata file for a list of all known corrections to the text). To read PDF (Adobe's Portable Document Format) files, you can either use Ghostscript, Adobe's free Acrobat Reader or any number of other suitable programs. The additional volume Introductory Electromagnetics: Practice, Problems and Labs by Z. Popović, and B. Popović contains full or partial solutions to some of the problems, and may also be downloaded. This file has incorporated all known corrections up to the present time. If new corrections are found, I will update my files; the date of the latest revision is given at the beginning of each file.

If you are curious to learn more about electromagnetism, or to see the viewpoints of different textbooks, I have also put the following books on reserve at the Engineering Library:

Additionally, the following Internet resources may be of interest:

CU Engineering Fellows (fellows.colorado.edu) may offer review and study sessions for this course if interest is expressed.

Grades

Your grade for the course will be determined as follows (the value of your weakest hour or final exam will be reduced by 5%):

Homework

25%

2 Hour Exams

25% each

Final Exam

30%

Each component of your grade will be assigned a grade (A, A-, B+, B, B-, etc.) based on a curve for that particular component. Different components (e. g., Homework and Hour Exam #1) will generally be curved differently. The grade is converted to a grade point between 0 and 4 (A = 4.0, B = 3.0, etc.), and it is these grade point values which are weighted according to the table above.

As an example, suppose you got a B (3.0) on the homework, a D (1.0) on the first hour exam, a C (2.0) on the second hour exam and a C (2.0) on the final exam. Your course grade is then:

(3.0)×0.25 + (1.0)×[0.25 - 0.05] + (2.0)×0.25 + (2.0)×0.3 = 2.05

which is a C.

I expect that you will abide by all University expectations of academic integrity. Please read the information on this, as well as on disabilities, religious observances and standards of behavior.

Class preparation

You should read the assigned sections of the book prior to each lecture. I and the TAs will always be glad to help you with any questions you may have during our office hours since there will not always be time for long answers during the lectures. Please feel free to come in for help. I hope the office hours will be such that everyone in the course can make use of at least some of them. In any case, you can also make an appointment to see me at other times. If you don't understand something, I'll never know until you ask or until you fail an exam. Why not ask?

Homework

Homework assignments are due every Friday in the lecture period unless indicated to the contrary on the calendar below. Please put your student number next to your name on your homework and exams (anything you turn in to be graded). It helps to resolve ambiguities when there is difficulty reading your handwriting. Late homework is not accepted. You can turn homework in early by putting them in my mailbox in the ECEE office (make sure to put them in the slot below my name).

"EK" Homeworks

Problems marked "EK" in the homework assignments come from a collection of my own problems, which may be downloaded in PDF format. All "EK" problems will be kept in one file, which will be updated when necessary as the semester progresses. The date of the last update will be placed at the beginning of the file for reference.

Software

Occasionally you may need to compute or plot something which is a little more complex than a handheld calculator is convenient for. In such a case, you may use any appropriate software, so long as your results are clear. Matlab, Mathematica and MathCad are all fine for this purpose; even Excel works well. Several freeware programs are listed below which can be used if you don't want to pay for software specifically for this course.

Exams

There will be two in-class (50 minute) hour exams. The exams are closed-book and closed-notes, but you may bring one (for the hour exams) or two (for the final exam) 8-˝" by 11" sheet(s) of notes and a calculator. The schedule of exams is listed in the calendar. Currently planned dates are October 2 and November 6, 2015, but these are subject to minor changes if circumstances warrant. The final exam (2-˝ hours long) will be held on Wednesday, December 16, 2015 from 1:30 to 4:00 PM in room Fleming 157. The final exam will be cumulative, but with emphasis on the final third of the course. Thus, half of the questions on the final exam will be on chapters 1-15 and 17, and the other half will be on the material from chapters 18-22.

If you have 3 or 4 final exams on Wednesday, December 16, you need to see the instructor(s) of the course(s) that have their final exams in the third (and possibly fourth) time slots of that day in a timely manner, to make arrangements to take those exams on a different day in accordance with University rules. The official deadline for doing so is Friday, October 30, 2015.

Sample Exams

Samples of exams from earlier semesters will be posted here.

Syllabus and Schedules

The calendar below gives a day by day list of lecture topics, reading and homework assignments. I will not announce these separately in class; it is your responsibility to check this page for all assignments, and to be prepared appropriately.

Calendar

Refer to lecture and reading assignment schedule for lecture topics and homework assignments. HW = Homework due that day.
Problems numbered x.x are taken from the text (Notaroš); problems numbered Px.x are taken from the supplementary text (
Popović and Popović);problems numbered EKx.x are from the supplemental homework problems provided in PDF format.
Homework assignments will not be changed when there is less than one week until they are due; otherwise they may be changed as needed. If you like to do homework well ahead of time, be warned of this and check before turning in your assignment that you have done the correct problems.

August

24
Lecture 1



26
Lecture 2



28
Lecture 3

HW: 1.2, EK1.3

31
Lecture 4





September



2
Lecture 5



4
Lecture 6

HW: 1.10, 1.13, 1.22, EK3.5

7
NO CLASSES

(Labor Day holiday)


9
Lecture 7


11
Lecture 8

14
Lecture 9


16
Lecture 10


18
Lecture 11

21
Lecture 12


23
Lecture 13


25
Lecture 14

28
Lecture 15



30
Lecture 16




October





2
Hour Exam #1


5
Lecture 17



7
Lecture 18



9
Lecture 19


12
Lecture 20


14
Lecture 21


16
Lecture 22

19
Lecture 23



21
Lecture 24



23
Lecture 25


26
Lecture 26


28
Lecture 27


30
Lecture 28

November

2
Lecture 29



4
Lecture 30


6
Hour Exam #2

9
Lecture 31


11
Lecture 32


13
Lecture 33

16
Lecture 34



18
Lecture 35



20
Lecture 36

23

NO CLASSES


(FALL BREAK)
24

NO CLASSES


(FALL BREAK)
25

NO CLASSES


(FALL BREAK)
26

NO CLASSES


(Thanksgiving holiday)
27

NO CLASSES


(Thanksgiving holiday)
30
Lecture 37





December




2
Lecture 38




4
Lecture 39

7
Lecture 40




9
Lecture 41



11
Lecture 42

LAST DAY OF CLASSES


16

Final Exam               1:30 - 4:00 PM             Room FLMG 157




Lecture and Reading Schedule

Lecture No.

Topic

Reading Assignment [from text (BN) or Supplementary Textbook (PP)]

1

Introduction; Fields vs. Classical Circuits

NONE

2

Coulomb's and Ampere's Force Laws

BN, sections 1.1 and 4.1; PP, Chapters 1 and 2

3

Electric Fields

BN, sections 1.2-1.4; PP, sects. 3.1-3.3

4

Computing E fields from charge distributions

BN, section 1.5

5

Field lines; The electrostatic potential

BN, sections 1.6-1.8

6

E from the potential

BN, 1.9-1.10

7

More examples on potential; Introduction to Gauss' Law


8

Using Gauss' Law


9

Gauss' Law Examples; Conductors


10

Conductors in Electrostatic Field; Electrostatic Induction


11

Electrostatic Images


12

Dielectrics


13

Polarization


14

Generalized Gauss' law; Boundary conditions


15

Steady Current in Conductors


16

Resistors and Electrodes


17

Capacitance, Electrostatic Coupling


18

Electrostatic Energy, Forces and Applications


19

The Magnetic Field; Biot-Savart Law


20

Ampere's Law

21

More Ampere's Law; Magnetization

22

Magnetization and Ampere's Law

23

Magnetic Material Properties

24

Electromagnetic Induction; Faraday's Law

25

Mutual and Self Inductance

26

Magnetic Field Energy; Magnetic Applications


27

Introduction to Transmission Lines; Waves on a Uniform TL


28

Reflection of Waves on a TL

29

Impedance of Loaded TLs
30
TL Examples and VSWR

31

Lossy TLs


32

Time-Domain TL Behavior


33

Displacement Current; Integral and Differential Forms of Maxwell's Equations


34

Phasor Form of Maxwell's Equations; Poynting's Theorem


35

Plane Waves

36

Plane Wave Polarization and Velocities

37

Reflection of Plane Waves (Normal Incidence)

38

Reflection of Plane Waves (Oblique Incidence)
39
Skin Effect

40

Waveguides and Antennas


41

EM Wave Applications


42
Whatever's left



Some Free Programs of Interest

QuickField 

A "student version" of a program which can numerically solve (among other things) electrostatic and magnetostatic field problems. This version is limited as to problem size, but is free.

FEMM - Finite Element Method Magnetics

Freeware. From the reference manual: "FEMM is a suite of programs for solving low frequency electromagnetic problems on two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric domains. The program currently addresses linear/nonlinear magnetostatic problems, linear/nonlinear time harmonic magnetic problems, and linear electrostatic problems." FEMM is a Windows program, useful for getting numerical solutions of fields and parameters such as inductance and capacitance, among many possible applications.

XLPlot

Windows Freeware. From the website: "Create your graphs for scientific publication with XL-Plot. It reads ascii files and it outputs a vector drawing. XL-Plot is for Windows 95,98, 2000 and XP. The primary purpose of XL-Plot is to create a figure for scientific publication rapidly. It contains a few basic statistical functions, such as Students t-test and linear correlation of two sets of data (two columns in a spreadsheet). XL-Plot has a number of built-in functions that can be fitted to the data in columns on a spreadsheet or to a curve in a graph. The user can easily add fitting functions of his own design.Additional options are Fourier Transformation, (de-)convolution and Matrix inversion." It is a modest piece of software that does a surprising number of tasks well.

Winplot

Another freeware plotting program for Windows, concentrating on the display of functions. This one can do 3D (surface) plots. It has some animation capabilities as well.

Euler

A freeware numerical mathematics program similar in many ways to Matlab. It is available for Windows, Linux, Unix and OS/2 (this latter is no longer maintained). May be worth a look, though I haven't really used it myself.

Scilab

A free mathematical software package for various Unix flavors and for Windows, somewhat more advanced in capabilities than Euler. It aims to do many of the same things as Matlab. From its website: "Scilab is a scientific software package for numerical computations in a user-friendly environment. It features:

Old Announcements